Category Archives: Music

CHRIS MARTIN AND COLDPLAY PERFORM HURRICANE HARVEY TRIBUTE TO HOUSTON, NOT EVERYONE IS IMPRESSED [OPINION]

Chris Martin and Coldplay were forced to cancel a show in Houston last Friday, as Hurricane Harvey prepared to unleash its fury on Texas. As reported by Ace Showbiz Coldplay, and a host of other artists, canceled shows in Houston as Harvey approached. The British band said that Harvey would put” fans safety at risk,” and as a result, they canceled the show. It is not yet known whether Coldplay will be able to reschedule the show when the situation in Houston improves. As things stand, who knows when Houston will be ready to host rock concerts again.

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SMITHS LEGEND MORRISSEY BACK WITH NEW SOLO ALBUM AND HOLLYWOOD BOWL SHOW: HOW TO SCORE PRESALE TICKETS

English singer Steven Patrick Morrissey is better known by his stage name “Morrissey,” and he shot to fame as the singer with 1980’s alternative band The Smiths. Morrissey captured the attention of a worldwide audience, but The Smiths music resonated most strongly with those in his native Manchester. Morrissey’s lyrics reflected the lives of working class youth in England and his dry, acerbic wit, and his political views hit out at the establishment and at Margaret Thatcher’s brand of politics. With songs like “Heaven Knows I’m Miserable Now” Morrissey’s lyrics were downbeat and hard-hitting, a theme that continued into his solo work after The Smiths broke up in 1987.

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NEW ALBUM ‘STRENGTH OF A WOMAN’ SETS MARY J. BLIGE FREE FROM DRUGS, DIVORCE AND HER CHEATING PROTÉGÉ

Soul singer Mary J. Blige is back with a new 2017 album Strength Of A Woman. Released on April 28, Strength Of A Woman is a powerful and emotional record that deals with hard hitting topics, and it is Blige’s first releases since 2014’s The London Sessions. According to Vulture, Strength Of A Woman is essentially Mary J. Blige’s “divorce record.”

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Maria Moss Covers Maria Carey’s ‘All I Want For Christmas’ – video

Maria Moss is a singer, songwriter and dancer who lives in London. She mixes pop music with R&B, Dance, Soul and Latin and Spanish and Arab influences.

She is barely 25 years old and has been on the stage for more than a decade, Moss started singing when he was three. From stages in London or Los Angeles to Barcelona, Maria Moss does not leave the audience indifferent wherever she goes. When she was 14, she won the “The English Key” award singing “When You Believe” by Mariah Carey and Whitney Houston on Cantamania, a TV3 program (Salou edition).

Since 2015, Moss has performed in Spain, the United Kingdom and the United States. She writes her songs since she was a teenager, but it was not until December 17 when her first official single ‘Light’ came out. Her debut EP ‘Old Times’ will be released on January 21st. ‘Light’ is already available on all digital platforms (Spotify, Amazon, Itunes, Apple Music, Google Play, etc.), physical copies of ‘Old Times’ will be able to purchase through the Maria Moss’ website: www .mariamossofficial.com.

[Featured Image By Curtis Lewis]

Camden Roundhouse – IN The Round Concert Announcements

Lambchop, Jaga Jazzist, Lisa Hannigan, Ghetts, Orchestra Baobab, Susheela Raman, Julian Cope, Tiger Lillies and Martha Wainwright with Ed Harcourt in a double-bill make up 2017’s In the Round.

The Roundhouse, currently celebrating its 50th anniversary year, launches its 2017 Music Programme with the return of In the Round, a series of intimate performances set in a rarely seen fully seated concert set up in the iconic main space.

2017’s In the Round series is a season of debuts. With most artists performing at the Roundhouse for the first time – only Martha Wainwright has headlined the venue before – and with many, including Martha, performing new material. Hailing from Nashville, music pioneers Lambchop will perform music from their acclaimed musical re-invention Flotus. From Norway Jaga Jazzist will be bringing their unique mix of electronica, rock and jazz, with material from their extensive back catalogue as well as their most recent album, Starfire. From Dublin, Lisa Hannigan will be performing music from her critically acclaimed new album At Swim, arguably her most bewitching to date.  Orchestra Baobab, undoubtedly one of Africa’s supergroups, bring some of the magic of Dakar to the Roundhouse with a sneak preview of their spring 2017 World Circuit album.  Tamil Londoner, Susheela Raman, is known for her exciting collaborations and here she brings the Ghost Gamelan Orchestra from Indonesia to perform music from her forthcoming album, Ghost Gamelan. Ghetts, one of the most prominent figures on the grime scene celebrates the ten year anniversary of his second mixtape, Ghetto Gospel by performing it live in full.  A very special double bill of superlative singer-songwriters Martha Wainwright and Ed Harcourt will perform solo sets before coming together for a one-off collaboration. Anarchic Brechtian street opera trio, The Tiger Lillies, will be presenting for the first time their brand new album, Cold Night in Soho, their first band release in 10 years. Finishing the series in grand style is the extraordinary Julian Cope – who has come to be defined as much by his extra-musical pursuits as his musical output.

julian-cope-in-the-round

As part of the Roundhouse’s work with young people, support acts will all be emerging artists who have progressed their careers through the Paul Hamlyn Roundhouse Studios – where the Roundhouse offers life-changing creative opportunities for thousands of young people each year. They will perform in either the main space or upstairs in Torquil’s Bar.

Thursday 26 January

Lambchop + support

Tickets £17.50 – £27.50 / Doors 7pm

Nashville music pioneers Lambchop are considered one of the most consistently brilliant American groups to have emerged since their breakthrough album Nixon in 2000, with frontman Kurt Wagner one of the most talented singer-songwriters of our age.

lambchop-in-the-round

With a discography revealing 11 albums and a multitude of influences with an ever-shifting group of players, Lambchop have long since shaken off the alt-country label that once defined them.   Their musical signature, quite simply, is the distinctive songwriting, deeply insightful lyrics and the wistful, warm, slightly cracked and often murmured vocals of Wagner.

In November 2016, Lambchop release their twelfth studio album, Flotus (For Love Often Turns Us Still) marking a significant change in direction.  Kurt Wagner has set aside what he has learned over the last 30 years and embarked on a musical adventure exploring modern day R&B, soul, hip-hop and early electronica amongst other genres.  Anchored by the Lambchop hallmark – beautifully nuanced arrangements, quietly powerful and hugely beguiling songs with brilliantly skewed vocals – the result sounds like no one else, yet unmistakably like Lambchop.  Imbued with the magic energy of an artist stumbling upon the thrill of the new, Lambchop’s In the Round performance promises to be a very special show presenting a stunning piece of work, one of the most impressive achievements of Lambchop’s career.

Friday 27 January

Jaga Jazzist + support

Tickets £15 – £20 / Doors 7pm

Jaga Jazzist are one of the most celebrated and influential of the Norwegian post-jazz bands. Part jazz ensemble, part post-rock outfit and part electronica pioneers, they have always been an absurdly difficult band to pigeonhole. Their constant re-invention and restless energy has marked them out as standard-bearers for a new musical sound and one whose music has been a profound influence on both the contemporary jazz and electronica scenes, as well as helping to define a new musical space between the genres. Influenced by artists from Gil Evans to Radiohead, My Bloody Valentine to Tortoise, Oslo 13 to Motorpsycho and Fela Kuti to Steve Reich, Jaga Jazzist have created a sound unlike anyone else. Their live shows, driven by an arsenal of multi-instrumentalists – all leaders and producers in their own right – are marked by a hypnotic intensity that brings their already thrilling music to powerful life. For tonight’s very special performance and Roundhouse debut, expect to hear music from their recent electronica-heavy, Ninja Tune Records release, Starfire, alongside hits from their illustrious back catalogue.

 

“sounds that recall everything from Weather Report to big-band jazz, krautrock, Radiohead or even the Pat Metheny GroupThe Guardian

Saturday 28 January

Lisa Hannigan + support

Tickets £15 – £25 / Doors 7pm

 

Irish singer/songwriter Lisa Hannigan first came to light as an angel-voiced, somewhat mysterious figure singing harmonies alongside Damien Rice. When their seven-year collaboration came to an end, Hannigan released her first solo album, Sea Sew (2008), and her sparkling solo career was born. The self-released album was a runaway success, nominated for a Choice award in Ireland and a Mercury Music Prize in the UK. While Sea Sew was a joyous kaleidoscope of love songs, laments, sea shanties and glockenspiels, her second release, Passenger (2011) explored deeper, darker emotions. After touring Passenger for two years, Hannigan found writing her next album very hard. During this difficult period she also lent her voice to the orchestral score of Alfonso Cuaron’s film Gravity, as well as providing the voice of the mermaid in the Oscar-nominated Irish animation Song of the Sea. When The National’s Aaron Dessner contacted her about working together, things began to fall into place and At Swim was released in August 2016. These songs travel even deeper into a darkly magical space where the boundaries between love and death, past and present, grief and happiness, are dissolved, so this intimate show promises to be a truly magical evening.

“Hannigan’s soaring vocals never falter” The Observer

Monday 30th January

GHETTS +support

Tickets £12.50 – £15.00 / Doors 7pm

 In 2005, Ghetto, a stormy young artist from East London arrived on the grime scene with explosive, hard hitting lyrics and fast, intricate rhymes.  Originally a member of the notorious grime collective NASTY Crew, the MC rapper soon left to create his own collective, The Movement where he would work alongside artists such as Devlin, Wretch 32, and Schorcher.  Today, he goes under the moniker Ghetts and is regarded as a pioneer of the grime movement; a prominent figure that remains as relevant today as he did over ten years ago.

 

Known for his provocative, volatile style of rap, Ghetts has, since 20015,  released multiple mixtapes that have spawned many underground hits and grime anthems,  yet it was his 2014 debut studio release, ‘Rebel With a Cause’, that saw him smashing into the mainstream earning him three MOBO nominations – Best Male, Best Album and Best Grime Artist.

 

But for this very special show,  Ghetts revisits his second mixtape, 2007’s ‘Ghetto Gospel’ celebrating its ten year anniversary by performing it in full for the very first time.  ‘Ghetto Gospel’ was a far more mellow offering than the harder-edged recordings that preceded and followed it.  Its calmer tones and shift away from the unconcealed rawness of his other material provided a revealing exposé of Ghett’s depth and versatility as an artist.  The album became Ghett’s breakthrough that year and went on to become a grime classic.  Ghetts personally names it as his best body of work.

Tuesday 31st January

Orchestra Baobab + support

Tickets £15 – £25 / Doors 7pm

 

One of Africa’s great iconic bands, Orchestra Baobab create some of the world’s most sublime and truly distinctive music. Formed in 1970, taking their name from the Dakar nightclub where they were resident, they fused Afro-Cuban rhythm and Portuguese Creole melody with Congolese rumba, high life and a whole gamut of local styles, kick starting a musical renaissance in their native Senegal, which turned the capital, Dakar, into one of the world’s most vibrant musical cities. The band released dozens of recordings before disbanding in the mid-80s but it was their neglected 1982 album, Ken Dou Werente – which included many of their most famous songs, ‘Coumba’, ‘Ledi Njemme Mbodj’ and ‘Utru Horas’ – that became a cult-classic, re-released to huge acclaim by World Circuit Records in 1989 under the title Pirate’s Choice. The band reformed in 2001 with encouragement from Senegalese superstar Youssou N’Dour and the following year released Specialist in All Styles, their first album in nearly 20 years. In 2007 they released Made in Dakar, and now, nine years on, Orchestra Baobab are back in the studio recording their fourth album for World Circuit, which is set for release in Spring 2017.

Wednesday 1 February

Susheela Raman and Ghost Gamelan Orchestra + support

Tickets £15 – £20 / Doors 7pm

 

With a string of acclaimed albums to her name and a mesmerising voice and stage presence, Londoner Susheela Raman has a gift for finding amazing collaborators and for bridging musical worlds. From the many layered Indian and African crossovers on Mercury shortlisted debut Salt Rain to her recent five-star reviewed (Guardian, FT) collaboration with Sufi Qawals, she has forged a unique path. Recently, Raman and guitarist/producer Sam Mills have been in Indonesia delving into the mysteries of Javanese music, guided by maverick ‘contemporary gamelan’ composer Gondrong Gunarto. Susheela’s Ghost Gamelan Orchestra brings together Gondrong and three other crack multi-instrumentalists from the Javanese cultural hub of Surakarta, alongside some top London talent; two percussion maestros, Aref Durvesh (Nitin Sawhney, Jeff Beck, Joss Stone, Sting) and Pirashanna Theverajah (Ravi Shankar, Anoushka Shankar) plus virtuoso cellist and keyboardist Danny Keane (Mulatu Astatke, Bat for Lashes) and on Bass and Bassoon Jerry Meehan (Roxy Music, Robbie Williams and many others).  This show promises a broad range of material, including tracks from her EP celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Beatles Revolver album (released on Believe Digital on 28 October) and from her forthcoming album Ghost Gamelan.

 

“…wildly original, passionate and dangerous..” The Guardian

 

Thursday 2 February

Martha Wainwright + Ed Harcourt + support

Tickets £15 – £25 / Doors 7pm

 

A beguiling double-bill featuring two extraordinarily gifted singer-songwriters, Martha Wainwright and Ed Harcourt. Each will perform a solo-set – before coming together for a one-off collaboration.

 

With a wonderfully distinctive voice and an arsenal of powerful songs, Martha Wainwright is a profoundly gifted singer-songwriter who first grabbed our attention with the blistering Bloody Mother Fucking Asshole, named by the Sunday Times as one of their ‘songs of the year’ in 2005, a prelude to her breakthrough hit album Martha Wainwright. Further albums highlighted her growing maturity as a song-writer and storyteller of the highest calibre and in 2010 she toured the world promoting her third album, Sans Fusils, Ni Souliers, à Paris, a homage to the great Edith Piaf and was received with glowing reviews, leaving audiences captivated by her performance. Fortonight’s show she’ll perform material from her Nov 2016 release, Goodnight City, hailed as her best record yet. This album returns to the rawness of her first release and includes songs by Martha, as well as songs written by her friends and other great songwriters such as Beth Orton, Glen Hansard, her brother Rufus Wainwright, Michael Ondaatje, and Merrill Garbus of tUnE-yArDs.

 

Ed Harcourt is a genuine English treasure, with a trove of songs inspired by Carole King, David Bowie, Nina Simone, and Tom Waits, amongst others. Nominated for the 2001 MercuryPrize for his powerful debut album, Here Be Monsters, he has gone on to release seven highly acclaimed albums. He has also found time to collaborate with the likes of Paloma Faith, Beck, Burberry, the Libertines, and Marianne Faithfull, with whom he played at last year’s inaugural In the Round season.  For this show he appears playing a special stripped-back set of songs from his critically celebrated August 2016 release, Furnaces, hailed as his most ambitious and abrasive yet and produced by legendary producer Flood (Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds, PJ Harvey).

 

Friday 3 February

The Tiger Lillies + Support

Tickets £17.50 – £22.50 / Doors 7pm

 

The world of The Tiger Lillies is dark, peculiar and varied, with moments of deep sadness, cruel black humour and immense beauty. Formed in 1989, they remain one of the most unique, provocative and genre-defying bands one could come across. The music produced by this rampageous trio is a mixture of pre-war Berlin cabaret, anarchic opera and gypsy music, echoing the voices of Bertolt Brecht and Jacques Brel. Their songs cover all the dark aspects of life, from prostitution and drug addiction to violence and despair, always infused with a touch of twisted humor and sharp irony.  They have participated in numerous shows all over the world, collaborating with artists of all disciplines: from circus performers to Shakespearean actors, experimental dancers to avant-garde photographers and burlesque puppeteers to classical music ensembles.

 

For this very special show, the band will be performing from their new album of band songs, Cold Night in Soho – their first album in 10 years not to be tied in to one of their theatre shows. Cold Night in Soho is released on 3 February.

 

This delicious dark cabaret is Kurt Weill as scripted by Aleister Crowley, and the execution is impeccable throughout. Phenomenal.”  The Guardian

 

Saturday 4 February

Julian Cope + Support

Tickets £25 – £30 / Doors 7pm

 

As poet, musicologist, historian, archaeologist, occultist, novelist and cultural commentator, Julian Cope has come to be defined as much by his extra-musical pursuits as his musical output. He came to prominence in 1978 as the front man of Teardrop Explodes, a brassy post-punk outfit whose four-year reign as a top-ten chart act notoriously ended, in part, to Cope’s well-documented love of munching acid.  Following a brief period of recovery, Cope embarked on a solo career that has spawned over 20 highly acclaimed recordings and cemented his place as one of the most visionary, supremely eclectic and innovative musicians of our time.

 

Cope’s solo recordings have run the musical gamut from crisp, melodic rock tunes – his 1986 single World Shut Your Mouth became a top 20 hit – to psychedelic funk, electro-acoustic, Krautrock-inspired instrumentals, space-rock, garage-rock, techno and anarcho-punk.  Similarly, a dazzling array of collaborations and esoteric projects have seen him working with drone metal band Sunn O))) alongside his long-standing band, the ostentatious pro-metal power trio, Brain Donor. Lyrically, his songs teem with political content outlining his own personal beliefs on a number of subjects – religion, bigotry corporate greed and environmental destruction. As a writer, Cope has produced six acclaimed books that take in archaeology, musicology, antiquarianism, plus a two-part autobiography and much-lauded books on krautrock and Japanese rock and an ecstatically reviewed novel.

Live, Cope is an extraordinary and engaging performer; a witty raconteur who dresses, as the Guardian once noted, “like an acid-fried biker”.  Expect an eclectic set of post-punk, psychedelic rock and highlights from Cope’s long musical career.

 

Roundhouse presents In the Round
26 January – 04 February 2017
roundhouse.org.uk

Roundhouse, Chalk Farm Road,

London, NW1 8EH

 

Tickets roundhouse.org.uk

0300 6789 222
Booking fees apply – see website for full details

 

 

 

 

Will Kanye West’s Tour Cancellation and Kim Kardashian Robbery Boost Yeezy’s Net Worth in 2016

The world knows by now that Kanye West has been hospitalized and is reportedly suffering from exhaustion. Yeezy had an onstage meltdown in Sacramento last weekend and subsequently canceled the rest of his tour.

All in all, it hasn’t been a great month for West or his wife, Kim Kardashian. She was reportedly robbed of several million dollars worth of diamonds while in Paris. Many people thought that Kanye had finally lost his mind when he launched into an onstage rant against Hillary Clinton, Jay-Z, and Beyonce. It seemed that people’s fears were being realized when West was admitted to hospital for “psychiatric evaluation.”

Architects – An Open Letter After The Brixton Academy Gig

Dear Architects,

Let me begin by saying that I don’t normally write about a gig where I have been turned down for a photo and review pass.  I cover literally hundreds of bands a year for a number of music magazines so I don’t often get turned down but  I was turned down for last nights gig.

That said, once in a while you are privileged enough to witness an event so extraordinary and, so deeply moving that making no comment would simply be a dereliction of journalistic responsibility.  I witnessed just such an event at last nights Brixton academy show.

In many ways last night was always going to be an extraordinary event.  The Brixton Academy is a legendary venue, the atmosphere at a sold out show incredible.  Your choice of support bands was simply genius.  In Bury Tomorrow and Stick To Your Guns you selected two great bands to support you.  Bands who are not just a great foil for your own music but bands who share your belief that music can change the world.

The message across the evening was a simple one and one shared by all of the bands present, and I include Stray From the Path though they were not playing.  There cannot have been a single person in the 5000 strong audience who don’t agree that music can change the world.  The love and respect in the room, from the audience and from the stage was humbling.  The mosh-pits were brutal, but everyone looked after each other, united in the sheer joy of rebellion and the understanding that we all had 4999 people around us who, for the most part, share our view of the world and our concerns for the future.

A post shared by Alan Ewart (@soundofmysummer) on

 

There can be little doubt that most of us are united in the understanding of Sea Shepherds message “If the seas dies we die too.”  You won’t have found anyone who disagrees about bands selling VIP access tickets.  I have loved Blink-182 for years.  In June they are back in the UK and selling VIP access for up to £505 a head.  Sam was 100% correct when he said this is nothing more than fan exploitation.  Not only will I not be paying for VIP access, my son and I are both saying “fuck you Blink-182.”  We won’t be attending any of the shows as fans and I won’t be covering them in a professional capacity.

Blink-182 are supposed to be punk band, where is the punk ethos in exploiting fans in this way?  Dan from Bury Tomorrow was absolutely right when he said every successful band should be willing to stand by the march stand and high 5 every single person who paid to come and see the show.

In many ways it was humbling to hear Dan say that Architects will never take being able to play their music to their fans for granted.  You know, no-one resents bands like Architects achieving the level of success that they so richly deserve.  Architects have always been true to themselves and, just as importantly true to their fans.  Your success has been well earned and it is a pleasure to have had the opportunity to play an infinitesimally small part in that by buying tickets for your shows, your merchandise and of course your music.

It was really interesting to hear Sam talking about the power of Metalcore music to change the world.  This year should be a clarion call for your generation.  Brexit, the election of Donald Trump and recent announcements that climate change is already touching the upper-limit that we are warned could lead to global catastrophe.  Sam’s call to action is a powerful one.  The current generation “will” change the world he said.  Sam is almost right, the fact is that this generation “must” change the world.

The problem is that your generation faces a system of government and a world economic system that is stacked against you.  You can’t have failed to notice the number of people waving their iPhones in the air last night.  That small symbol of corporate greed is a microcosm of the challenge your generation faces.

We know that almost everyone at last nights show had fire in their bellies for the four hours we shared last night.  Sadly, as we all return to our lives, we will almost all fall back into the consumerism that supports the world order.  We will all be looking to upgrade to the next iPhone model or to buy the next gadget.  Most will return to crappy jobs, happy enough to be exploited by a system that further lines the pockets of the multi-billionaires who exploit the poor and the planets resources to make money they can never spend.

This is a system so corrupt, so disingenuous and yet so “normal” that we rarely give it a second thought.  It is tragic that we don’t just allow the system to fuck us over, we bend over and hand it the lube.  If we are to learn anything from Brexit and Trumps election, it is the fact that people are “sick of this shit.”  Anything, simply anything looks better than what we have now.  Its not true of course.  Brexit and Trump show us that things can get worse.  In our “so-called” democracies we have three choices.  The first two are “bad” and worse.”  The third is the one no-one talks about, real change.

It is easy to sit back and say that nothing I do will change things.  That collective apathy is what blocks real change.  As a youngster during the 1970’s punk rock changed my life.  Growing up in conflict torn Belfast in the 1970’s was no picnic, at 16 I was already on the fringes of paramilitary organisations when Stiff Little Fingers Inflammable Material changed my life.  It gave me the courage to change my life, to leave Belfast behind and to seek a better way.

It was a better route for me, but I really believed punk-rock could change the world.  It failed and sadly I and my generation have failed yours.  Make no mistake we tried.  We got out on the streets, we rioted and we fought.  We even had some small victories.  We managed to overturn the hated Poll Tax but we lost the war.  Through the miners strike and the Wapping dispute we fought hard but we lost. Our defeat meant that a way of life was lost.  We allowed “money” to destroy our ability to organise.

A post shared by Alan Ewart (@soundofmysummer) on

Your battle is far more important that ours, your battle is for the future of humankind.  I am ashamed that my generation has put you in this position, but for the sake the generations to come you must win.  I don’t think it is an exaggeration to say that, in todays world, it is perhaps only music that can be the catalyst for change.  Music can unite us.  Bands like Architects, Enter Shikari and The King Blues understand this.  I beg you all to be that catalyst, last night showed that you understand what is at sake.  Never surrender, never give up.  Be the change the world so desperately needs.

Finally I applaud you all for the way you honoured Tom Searle last night.  Both Dan and Sam showed us that life is fragile and fleeting.  I can only imagine how you all felt.  How proud you must have been and yet your hearts must have been breaking you wished that Tom had been able to share such a remarkable moment in your history.  Tom would have been incredibly proud of you all and I am sure that the whole Searle family must have been bursting with both pride and sadness.

I fell incredibly humbled and grateful to have been present to witness such an amazing evening.  I haven’t had the privilege to know any of you personally but I was very proud of you all last night.  I shared the experience with my 18-year-old son, both of us proud to have shed tears and experienced incredible highs right along with you.

Architects, and all of the bands who share your ethos, are the future.  I thank you from the bottom of my heart for caring, for trying and for fighting to change the world.  I wish you every success and victory in the battles to come.